IIHS

Convertibles just as safe as cars with roofs: IIHS

The lack of a roof does not mean a lack of safety when it comes to cars, according to an IIHS study released on Tuesday. 

Even with cloth tops, modern convertibles don’t pose a greater crash and fatality risk than sedans or coupes. In fact, there were fewer crashes and fatalities in convertibles. An analysis of crash fatality data of convertibles that were up to five years old during 2014-2018 showed that convertibles were involved in 6% fewer crashes per miles traveled and death rates were 11% lower than in conventional cars.  

“There’s no statistical basis for concerns that the

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Crossover SUVs deadlier to pedestrians: IIHS study

Since the spread of SUVs beginning in the late-1990s, safety advocates have decried the effect of these larger, heavier utility vehicles on car crashes. That same argument applies today to pedestrians, even as advanced safety features have proliferated alongside crossover SUVs, the IIHS suggested in a study released Tuesday. 

At speeds faster than 19 mph, SUVs are more likely to kill a pedestrian than a car; at higher speeds, SUVs are even more lethal. Though SUVs have adopted more car-like designs with lower front ends to help limit the impact on crashes with other cars, the IIHS says there hasn’t

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Ford Fiesta, other small cars top IIHS list of deadliest vehicles

Small cars continue to be the most dangerous type of vehicle for drivers, according to a report released by the IIHS on Thursday.

Small cars and minicars accounted for 15 of the 20 deadliest vehicles for drivers, with the Ford Fiesta having the most driver deaths during the period of the study, from 2015 to 2018. 

“Smaller vehicles offer less protection for the driver in crashes, and their lighter mass means that they take the brunt of collisions with larger vehicles,” said Joe Nolan, IIHS senior vice president of vehicle research.

Predictably, full-size SUVs such as the GMC Yukon had

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IIHS reports that new Jeep Wrangler SUV rolled over on its side during driver-side crash

The IIHS reported Thursday that the new Jeep Wrangler, which was last comprehensively updated for the 2018 model year, tipped over onto its passenger side during its driver-side small overlap crash test.

The insurance industry-funded safety watchdog said the Wrangler was tested three times, twice by the agency and once by the automaker. The automaker reported no rollovers in its testing, but the agency said the SUV tipped in both of its tests that were conducted to verify the automaker’s findings.

In the crash test, the IIHS said the Wrangler was “Acceptable” at protecting its driver during the small-overlap crash

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